A Day in the Life : Friday the Sixteenth of May


Last month I had another opportunity to film the boys of Hellogoodbye performing, this time at the Crocodile here in Seattle. I enlisted the help of my talented friend, Johnny Valencia, to help with the shoot. Using two Canon 5D Mark II’s with Zeiss 85mm and 25mm lenses, we shot the entire show, but I’m finally getting around to editing the footage now that finals are finished.

Design 387 // Visual Storytelling : Sharks For Survival: Video, Poster & Website


This spring quarter, we had our Visual Storytelling class, taught by Bill Flora. Our assignment was to work with a client, Conservation International, to visually tell a story about the environmental issues they are involved in. In a team of four, Roy, Christoffer, Jennifer and I were selected to focus on ocean health.

We spent several weeks struggling to decide which part of ocean health was the best story to tell. We considered the environmental impact of the textile industry in Bangladesh, but the issue was not one that our client was involved with. The recent creation of the Ocean Health Index had potential, but was difficult to effectively connect our audience with its story. We finally landed on the importance of one unlikely species: sharks.

Our audience was assigned to us: approaching 30 years old, intelligent, Monocle subscriber and Economist reader. With a story that is seemingly so distant from the lives of the urban dweller, we painstakingly constructed a media plan to connect our audience with the story of the sharks, ultimately leading back to Conservation International’s mission and work.

We chose to establish the viewer’s first contact with our campaign in as positive of a light as possible, evoking pride in the accomplishments of the human race, our innovation supported by the resources provided by our planet, Earth kept in a delicate balance by sharks. Our video resonates this central theme, but only offers a glimpse of how sharks support our environment, leading the viewer to investigate further through our website.

The idea behind our poster was to create a tactile experience between the urban dweller and the enormous amount of shark deaths each year. The passerby is drawn closer with an ambiguous, scary fact that “73 Million Are Killed Every Year”, floating above an ocean of laser cut sharks, attached only by their fins. If curious to investigate further, people are forced to tear the sharks from the poster, revealing our website link on the backside of the finned shark, leaving an empty red body behind. There is poetry in the poster, having the user echo the treatment of sharks by humans.

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While Discovery’s Shark Week is extremely entertaining, it doesn’t focus on the important role that sharks play in our ecosystem. To enhance the Shark Week experience, we created an app for viewers to interact with sharks, using beautiful images and video from Conservation International. Striving to tell the complete story of how sharks are magnificent creatures, not to be feared and vilified, but to be respected and protected.

Our website completes the story, which you can visit here. Diving deeper into the dismal reality that sharks face, visitors learn about the important role sharks play in our ocean.

I am currently involved in a small team of Interaction Design undergraduates and graduates helping with Ann Hamilton’s latest installation at the Henry Art Gallery. The students are offering their own responses to her concept, to help further discuss and explore the possibilities within the space and interaction of the installation.

I am currently involved in a small team of Interaction Design undergraduates and graduates helping with Ann Hamilton’s latest installation at the Henry Art Gallery. The students are offering their own responses to her concept, to help further discuss and explore the possibilities within the space and interaction of the installation.

Design 386 // Physical Interaction Design : Final


Melankoli was an incredibly satisfying outcome to a long, arduous process of production. Through the course of the quarter, we faced challenges with vacuum forming, laser cutting, soldering, fried NeoPixels, and Arduino programming. In the end, however, we were able to successfully achieve our vision.

The tripod dowels, made of oak, nest beautifully in the giant white polystyrene shell. The 12” round mirror is surrounded with a semi-transparent white acrylic ring, which diffuses the light from within the shell. A clear acrylic plate secures the mirror and the ring together fastening the set into the shell. This plate is also used to install a close-range infrared sensor and the NeoPixels, individually programmable RGB lights, around the back of the mirror. The lights and sensor are controlled by an Arduino, a microcontroller, which is given a program to run through software based on the Processing programming language. Our program tells the Arduino to use the sensor’s input and translate that data to output through the NeoPixels. When a person is absent, there is no light, but as a person steps into the sensor’s field of range, the light activates, growing brighter as the person approaches the mirror. There are also countless other programs that could be uploaded to the Arduino to achieve different interactions between the light and the person that stands in front of it.

The form is lightweight, airy, almost transparent, especially with the mirror reflecting the surrounding light, opening up the space that it inhabits.

We’d like to give a special thanks to Kyle Helseth from the Industrial Design department for holding our hand through the journey.

Design 387 // Visual Storytelling : Recording Studio
A photo from the isolation booth, narrating the script for our video.

Design 387 // Visual Storytelling : Recording Studio


A photo from the isolation booth, narrating the script for our video.

Design 386 // Physical Interaction Design : Wiring


After completing all of our construction, all that is left to do is install the electronics and some finishing on the edges.

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Design 386 // Physical Interaction Design : Production


Today, we started production on the outer shell for the interactive mirror. Using Rhino, we made a precise 3D rendering to translate into G-code that gets processed through the CNC mill. The end result is a high density foam mold which we vacuum form polystyrene over. Our first run showed the areas which need smoothing and figuring out how to adhere the two pieces of the mold together without using tape. 

Design 387 // Visual Storytelling : Campaign Strategy


Working on the story strategy and media plan for our team’s environmental campaign.

Design 386 // Physical Interaction Design : Programming the Arduino


Our electronic components finally arrived this week, and we successfully programmed our Sharp IR distance sensor to measure proximity as well as programmed our NeoPixels using the Arduino. Also, after several trips to collect the materials needed to build the mirror, we are ready to start production on our design. This includes using the CNC router to cut MDF into the form for the shell, heating polystyrene over the MDF, laser-cutting the acrylic plates for mounting the mirror and installing the lights, routing the wooden legs, and finishing the housing for the Arduino inside.

Design 386 // Physical Interaction Design : Concepting


This is just a teaser of what we’re working on at the moment: an interactive mirror with a nod to Bang & Olufsen.

Design 208 // Survey of Design History : Study Guide
Late night study session.

Design 208 // Survey of Design History : Study Guide


Late night study session.

A Day in the Life : Monday the Thirty-First of March


Spring vacation in Brazil.

Design 385 // Design Innovation & Society : Parnassus Café Concept


A supplementary animation from our presentation to argue for the most substantial costs involved in my team’s redesign of Parnassus Café and Gallery at University of Washington’s School of Art. Of the class, we had the most radical vision of changes to be made, which needed to be communicated in a positive and efficient manner when presenting to the campus architects and café administration. I was responsible for the “How much will it cost?” portion of the animation. My team consisted of interaction designers Christoffer Hart, Ciera Johl, along with industrial designers Vivian Chang, and Annie Deng.

With our design, the queue wasn’t just clearly defined/optimized, but dramatically improved, with multiple points of entry and exit. The claustrophobic workspace that Parnassus once provided, now offers a cleaner more organized environment for employees and patrons. The construction of a courtyard amphitheater brings natural light, revitalizes the stale basement air, and extends the amount of students able to stay and enjoy the café’s atmosphere. The amphitheater also serves as a well-deserved space to host events, gatherings, presentations and concerts.

Our design proudly and properly celebrates Parnassus’s 60 year history of serving coffee and the School of Art at UW.


Design 384 // Info Visualizations : Storyboarding & Final Web Experience
After moving on from the previous idea to create the project in Processing, due to time constraints and current abilities, I am storyboarding and building our group’s Olympic interactive data visualization in Edge Animate. Our group decided to create an interactive map of Rosa Khutor using Google Maps API, to embed within the Edge Animate project. This was a challenging experience for each team member, expanding our knowledge of web design with more complicated programming skills to achieve our vision.

Design 384 // Info Visualizations : Storyboarding & Final Web Experience


After moving on from the previous idea to create the project in Processing, due to time constraints and current abilities, I am storyboarding and building our group’s Olympic interactive data visualization in Edge Animate. Our group decided to create an interactive map of Rosa Khutor using Google Maps API, to embed within the Edge Animate project. This was a challenging experience for each team member, expanding our knowledge of web design with more complicated programming skills to achieve our vision.